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Posts Tagged ‘See Me in Print’

Big thank yous to both Alice Tessier and Laurie Gaboardi for the very nice article and lovely photos of our home and my studio that appear in the current issue of the Litchfield County Times magazine section.

LTC www.paulawalton.com

If you’ve read the article and find a few things printed in it confusing, don’t worry, it isn’t your memory playing tricks on you!  Take the article with a grain of salt & don’t believe everything you read. 🙂  No, I didn’t change my name, nor did I suddenly split into triplets, Paula, Pamela, and Paul!  Early American Life did not suddenly scrub my name off of 25 of their Directories of the Top Traditional Craftsmen in America (I’ve been juried into the EAL directory 29 times, not 4).  You cannot see photos of our home on Early American Life’s website, Facebook page or Twitter Account.  You can see them on one of my blogs, Paula Walton’s 18th Century Home Journal.   In spite of these errors and a few more wrong facts and misquotes, it is still an engaging write-up.  If you would like to read the article and see the accompanying photos, follow this link.

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A very big thank you to the New Milford Spectrum for the very nice article.

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Tess Rosch and Win Ross setting up to take photos in our 1790's kitchen as Brian looks on.

Tess Rosch and Win Ross setting up to take photos in our 1790 kitchen as Brian looks on.

On Saturday December 8, 2012 publisher Tess Rosch and photographer Winfield Ross of Early American Life arrived at our house slightly before 8 a.m.  They had originally planned to spend most of the day photographing, but due to a  snowstorm forecast for Pennsylvania and Ohio the following day, they revised their schedule and cut their visit to us in half so that they could drive back home ahead of the snow.  Win and Tess asked for a quick 10 minute tour of the house, then Tess chatted with us as Win moved from room to room with his lights and camera.  Tess had previously told me not to bother overly with arranging  vignettes throughout the house, since there would be plenty of time on Saturday to arrange items before photographing.  Imagine my surprise when she told me everything looked perfect as it was.  The only last minute additions necessary were  putting out the fresh beeswax candles that I hadn’t gotten to before they arrived, then lighting the candles and a fire in the hearth.  Tess cut one of the steamed puddings I had made and arranged a piece on a transferware plate and then we were set to go!

Here are some of my photos taken the day of the photo shoot.  They don’t compare to the gorgeous ones Win took, but they will give you an idea of what things looked like outside the frame of his lens.  You can read much more detailed captions about the items shown in the photos in the December 2013 issue of Early American Life.

Hearth www.paulawalton.com

just right www.paulawalton.com

looks good enough to eat www.paulawalton.com

finishing touches www.paulawalton.com

just perfect www.paulawalton.com

picture perfect www.paulawalton.com

Our front door and entry hallway.

Our front door and entry hallway.

Tiny shoes wait by the door for Saint Nicholas, along with carrots for his horse.

Tiny shoes wait by the door for Saint Nicholas, along with carrots for his horse.

Our parlor festooned with ever greens for the holidays.

Our parlor festooned with evergreens for the holidays.

One corner of the parlor houses a walnut cupboard filled with transferwear, early 19th century papier-mache millinar model dolls, and a few of my handmade bears.  It is topped by a tin flag box made by David Clagget, that holds Brian's father's memorial flag.

One corner of the parlor houses a walnut cupboard filled with transferwear, early 19th century papier-mache milliner model dolls, and a few of my handmade bears. It is topped by a tin flag box made by David Claggett, that holds Brian’s father’s memorial flag.

Waiting under the Christmas tree are some of my hand made reproduction Izannah Walker dolls and a pair of antique bears.

Waiting under the Christmas tree are some of my hand made reproduction Izannah Walker dolls and a pair of antique bears.

www.paulawalton.com

www.paulawalton.com

Three of my antique Izannah Walker dolls on top of a large corner cupboard that conceals a TV.

Three of my antique Izannah Walker dolls on top of a large corner cupboard that conceals a TV.

www.paulawalton.com

The fireplace in the parlor was added by previous owners.  I grain painted the mantle and surround.  Brian gave me the antique Shaker box stove as a present one Christmas.  A tiny child size metal carousel horse patiently waits along side the stove...

The fireplace in the parlor was added by previous owners. I grain painted the mantle and surround. Brian gave me the antique Shaker box stove as a present one Christmas. A tiny child size metal carousel horse patiently waits along side the stove…

A French papier-mache doll stands beside a small feather tree filled with some of the spun cotton ornaments that I make.

A French papier-mache doll stands beside a small feather tree filled with some of the spun cotton ornaments that I make.

My youngest son, Colin, painted portraits of himself and his two brothers as a Christmas present to me when he was majoring in Illustration at Pratt.

My youngest son, Colin, painted portraits of himself and his two brothers as a Christmas present to me when he was majoring in Illustration at Pratt.

The cooking hearth in our 1790's kitchen.

The cooking hearth in our 1790 kitchen.

Aview from the 1790's kitchen into the main floor bedchamber.

A view from the 1790 kitchen into the main floor bedchamber.

Looking from the 1790's kitchen into the dining room.

Looking from the 1790 kitchen into the dining room.

The Christmas tree in the 1790's kitchen.

The Christmas tree in the 1790 kitchen.

A folding 18th century campaign bed in the main floor bedchamber.

A folding 18th century campaign bed in the main floor bedchamber.

We assembled this rope bed from various bits and pieces of early 19th century beds, which I grain painted.

We assembled this rope bed from various bits and pieces of early 19th century beds, which I unified with grain painting.

A small Christmas tree graces the bay window in our 1840's kitchen.

A small Christmas tree graces the bay window in our 1840’s kitchen.

My favorite pie safe!

My favorite pie safe!

www.paulawalton.com

www.paulawalton.com

A child size C.W. Parker carousel horse that we restored gallops across the Rufus Porter style mural that I painted in the kitchen.

A child size C.W. Parker carousel horse that we restored gallops across the Rufus Porter style mural that I painted in the kitchen.

A rare child size M.C. Illions carousel horse stands a top a salmon painted pie safe from Brimfield, MA.  The crib quilt behind the horse is French, purchased from an antique shop in Paris.

A rare child size M.C. Illions carousel horse stands a top a salmon painted pie safe from Brimfield, MA. The crib quilt behind the horse is French, purchased from an antique shop in Paris.

www.paulawalton.com

www.paulawalton.com

The dining room is also home to a French carousel pig.

The dining room is also home to a French carousel pig.

My maternal great great grandfather made the one drawer black table.

My maternal great great grandfather made the one drawer black table.

One of my reproduction Izannah Walker dolls sits on a 19th century drop leaf table, with early salmon paint, along side 19th and early 20th century cloth dolls.  C. 1830-1840 milliners models fill the hanging box at the left.

One of my reproduction Izannah Walker dolls sits on a 19th century drop leaf table, with early salmon paint, along side 19th and early 20th century cloth dolls. C. 1830-1840 milliners models fill the hanging box at the left.

www.paulawalton.com

Remember Tess’s comment about the “dust not showing” ???  As you can see, even on a somewhat dreary December day our house is filled with light, so I did have to dust before they arrived!

To be continued…  Part 3 The Second Floor

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You can see our home on the cover and in the article on pages 20-29 in the latest issue of Early American Life magazine.

You can see our home on the cover and in the article on pages 20-29 in the latest issue of Early American Life magazine.

The magazine is currently in the mail to subscribers and will be for sale on newsstands on Tuesday 10/22/13.

EAL-ad-1213- www.paulawalton.com

If you are still curious about our house after reading the great article written by Jeanmarie Andrews and seeing the wonderful photographs taken by Winfield Ross in the current issue of Early American Life, you may want to come back here to read upcoming posts-

Behind the Scenes – What You Didn’t See in the Magazine

A Search Through Time, The History of Our House

Looking Back at Our 2013 Vegetable Gardens

In the meantime I invite you to enjoy browsing through past posts and receipts (recipes).

Paula

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From time to time, after doing a Google search, people who are trying to find information about my Spun Cotton Ornaments and Izannah Walker Dolls wind up here at my 18th Century Home Keeping Journal.  I realize that three blogs and a website can be a bit confusing.

So if you saw my spun cotton figures in Prims or Art Doll Quarterly, click here to visit my spun cotton blog.

If you read about my Izannah Walker dolls in Early American Life or saw my ads in A Simple Life or Prims magazines, click here to go to my Izannah Walker Doll Making Journal.

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